Results tagged ‘ Rick Ankiel ’

6/21/12 Rays at Nationals: Nationals Park

Ah. Another day, another game at Nationals Park. This time with extra 5 Hour Energy:

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There were some people giving out free samples, so I took a couple if for nothing more than the hydration they gave me on a scorching day.

Once I got inside the gates, I first went over to right field to try to get a ball from the pitchers pictured:

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Nothing. Every one of the pitchers ignored my request for a ball.

Then I moved over to the left field seats, where this was my view:

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Nothing.

I got Drew Storen to toss me my first ball right over the visitors’ bullpen. The ball had bounced off the outside of the bullpen, so check out the marks on it:

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After that, I went over to the Red Seats, where this was my view:

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You may notice that the pitcher in the middle of the three is Drew Storen. While he was there, I didn’t want to ask any of the pitchers for balls, figuring he would recognize me. When he left, however, I got Craig Stammen to toss me a ball:

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(Stammen is the guy to the right of my glove.) After that, a person came up to me and asked, “Hey, what’s your name?” When I responded, he said, “Do you write a blog on Mlblogs?” The mystery person was Steve Miller, a guy who also writes a Marlins-themed Mlblog entitled, Fish Fry. I had actually commented on it a couple of times, and he has a picture of himself on the blog, but for whatever reason, I didn’t recognize him until he introduced himself. This is just one example that if you are at the ballpark and spot myself or another ballhawk you recognize, introduce yourself. We don’t ignore you on purpose. It’s just that with all the interactions/faces that we come across during an average game, it can be hard to keep track of. I know that I personally will never “shoo” anyone away who introduces themselves, and the worst that will happen with most other ballhawks is they’ll ask you if you can talk after batting practice instead. Anyway, I stupidly didn’t get a picture with Steve.

Right after Steve introduced himself, I said, “Man, I wish I could get a hit ball instead of a toss-up, so I can give it away to one of these kids.” pointing to the kids in the first row.

Well, I did get a hit ball to come to me. A Nationals righty hit a high fly ball that I could tell was going to hit the warning track. I aligned myself with the ball and was ready to catch the ball as it bounced over the wall and right right towards my glove. Perfect, right? Well the ball hit off the warning track with such spin that once the ball bounced into my glove, it bounced right out of my glove. It then went into the gap between the two walls I the Red Seats. It was extremely frustrating, but they’ll be more on this ball in a bit.

Okay, now it’s time to make some New York ballhawks jealous. This was the view to my right:

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I caught my third ball of the game half way between the kid in the red and the man in the white in the row behind them. I was taking a picture, and just as I took the picture and was putting my phone in my pocket, Adam LaRoche hit a ball to my right. I was still putting it in my pocket, and had to make a back handed catch, leaning over a row of seats. I then gave that ball to the kid in the red hat in the next picture:

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Here is the view to my left:

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See the man in a blue shirt in the row emanating from the lower left corner of the picture? I got two hit balls right where he is standing in the picture. The first was a ball Roger Bernadina hit that landed in that spot. I then picked it up after running over there from where I took that last picture. I was the heading back to the spot where I took the picture from when Rick Ankiel hit a ball to the same exact spot. I moved back over to the spot and made the catch for which I got some applause.

Sensing that everyone in the section had just seen me get two balls, I asked, “Who hasn’t gotten a ball yet?” Four people raised their hands zero of which were kids with gloves. I didn’t want to be a jerk and crush people’s hopes that I had just gotten up, so I gave the ball away to a girl in the front row.

Soon after this, I was still thinking about if the ball I had dropped into the gap was still there. I figured it was, so I VERY quickly and discreetly went to the center field gap (In a different shirt, hat, and sunglasses, just in case.), and I glove tricked the ball, having learned from my previous- failed- attempt the day prior. After I reeled it up without anyone seeing me, I got out of there as fast as I could and went to left field.

In left field, Fernando Rodney tossed me a ball left handed. Naturally, the ball was off target. I then grabbed the ball and l gave it away to a girl who had been jokingly complaining that her brother had gotten a ball while she hadn’t. I should mention that this ball came after I missed two other toss-ups. One was a similar one from Rodney that I missed all together. The other was from another Rays player I never identified. Both sailed over my head, where I never got them.

The Rays had a VERY abbreviated batting practice. After getting 6 balls in Nationals B.P., I was eyeing double digits. The Rays actually only had one group of hitters, the pitchers. I thought the infielders were dead until I saw them take the field for the game.

Anyway, after batting practice ended, I got Jeremy Hellickson to toss me a ball as he entered the Rays dugout.

For those of you wondering why there is a lack of pictures in the latter part of this entry, my phone, on which I take pictures, was dying, so I didn’t want to use it that much. Finally, when it was essentially dead, I took my last picture of the day, which was my view for the rest of the game:

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I would have gone back and forth from the two sides of the outfield, but there were really only righties in the two line-ups that could homer (with the exception of Bryce Harper). I did go over to right field once or twice, but it wasn’t until the later innings I did so. On one of those trips, the usher I know asked me if I could give him two baseballs, so I did. If you are keeping track, that was now SIX of the eight balls I had snagged that I had given away. I will no longer field any “ballhawks are greedy” comments.

After the top of the inning, the Rays bullpen catcher, Scott Cursi, would warm up Desmond Jennings. EVERY inning, I went down to try and get the ball, and every inning ended the same way, me walking back up the stairs in dejection.

The Nationals won the game on the wings of Gio Gonzalez as he bested the Rays’ starter, Matt Moore. The final score was 5-2.

After the game, I went down to see if I could get the lineup card from Stan Boroski, the Rays’ bullpen coach. Not even a reaction when I asked him.

STATS:

• 8 Balls at this Game (2 pictured because I gave 6 away)

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numbers 277-284 for my “career”:

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• 62 Balls in 13 Games= 4.77 Balls Per Game
• 22 straight Games with at least 1 Ball
• 2 straight Games with at least 2 Balls
• 2 straight Games with at least 3 Balls
• 2 straight Games with at least 4 Balls
• 2 straight Games with at least 5 Balls
• 2 straight Games with at least 6 Balls
• 2 straight Games with at least 7 Balls
• 2 straight Games with at least 8 Balls
• 8 Balls x 29,551 Fans= 236,408 Competition Factor
• 75 Balls at Nationals Park in 15 Games= 5 Balls Per Game
• 8 straight Games at Nationals Park with at least 1 Ball
• 8 straight Games at Nationals Park with at least 2 Balls
• 5 straight Games at Nationals Park with at least 3 Balls
• 2 straight Games at Nationals Park with at least 4 Balls
• 2 straight Games at Nationals Park with at least 5 Balls
• 2 straight Games at Nationals Park with at least 6 Balls
• 2 straight Games at Nationals Park with at least 7 Balls
• 2 straight Games at Nationals Park with at least 8 Balls
• Time at Game 4:09-10:27= 6 Hours 18 Minutes

8/24/11 Diamonbacks at Nationals: Nationals Park

This was now the second game of  the series that was supposed to redeem my horrible roadtrip and I did get a total that was like triple my average on that trip but the day was an overall failure. I did bring my camera and took pictures with it but later realized that I had taken them without the memory card and I had lost them forever. So, I will just write up my bp and the pictures will come during the game portion of the entry. Here it goes:

I went immediately up to the second deck in Right Field which was absolutely empty. Within five minutes of me getting there three Rick Ankiel Home Runs came up there. I ended up with one. The first hit in the seats to my right and I kind of lolligagged to it because I was the only one in the section but the ball bounced back onto the field. It was semi-catchable but that’s not the worst part. Had I run after that ball I would have been in postion to catch a ball he hit on the very next pitch except further to the right. That one also bounced back onto the field. Ankiel then hit a third ball back to my left and this time it stuck in the seats. I went over and grabbed that ball. Sadly, I quickly forgot that I snagged that ball because I was still moping about the previous two so keep this fact in mind. I didn’t get any toss-ups from the pitchers even though I was the only one because they now recognized me. I mean the same kid in the same Nationals hat and shirt every game really isn’t that hard to spot/recognize but it only occurred to me after the game.

Ankiel & rest of group then finish their session and Ankiel went out to shag in Right Field. I asked him for a bseball and he said some obscure words I couldn’t make out and I asked him to repeat. “Make a muscle.” He said. I then held my cotton clad arm and he tossed me my second ball of the day.

My third ball of the day can be explained in two words: Todd Coffey. Well maybe not but the story goes that Todd Coffey likes to throw a baseball and likes to throw them random distances. When the pitchers finished a drill where they ran routes like a Wide Receiver, Todd Coffey took those seven baseballs and just threw them to random spots in the stands. He threw one to the upper deck, a few in foul territory (later pocketed by ushers), and most of them in the second deck where I was standing. One of those that he threw to the second deck was on the fly:

The bright red arrow is where I caught the ball and the fainter red circle points out a part of the stadium called the Miller Light Scoreboard Walk. It is like a bar section where there are discounted beers before every game and is part of the reason why the Upper Right field seats are so empty. Most people don’t go up there because of baseballs and those who do are more inclined to get turned off by all the people drinking. Anyway, that’s not why I bring it up here, the reason that I bring it up is because most of the balls launched to the second deck went there where it was funny to see a baseball go into a crowd of people that were drinking and see what happened when they realized the fact. Suffice to say, Chaos insumed. I marked that ball #198 because I forgot that I had gotten the Ankiel homer and so I thought my next ball was going to be #199 when in fact it was #200.

#200 came when a Nationals lefty hit a ball to my left and an usher with whom Alex Kopp and Garrett Meyer have had problems with raced me to the ball. I beat her to it  but she said she wanted to give it to someone. For the prospect of better ballhawk relationships I gave it to her not realizing that it was infact #200 and asked her who the ball was for she got someone caught off guard. I want to assume that it was because she thought of ballhawks as vile filth that only care about themselves and wouldn’t ask that question but she regained her composure within a second and answered that it was for her niece. She then asked me what I did with all the baseballs I got. I responded that I gave away about 1/3 to kids (Would you say this is about accurate? I actually used to give away more before the blog but since I like to keep enough to make for a good picture at the end of the entry) got about 1/6 signed (again used to do this a lot more last year because I wasn’t as focused on getting the balls themselves), and then kept the rest just in different places in my apartment (this is definitely true I have no idea what is going to happen with baseballs if I catch like 200 in a season. Most of the balls from this year are in unused bags because the filing cabinet I have is filled to the brim.) Soon after this, bp ended and the cages got pulled away. I had a clue why. While talking to a fan yesterday waiting in line for the gates to open, I found out that had the stadium opened on time, the Diamondbacks would not be taking bp in favor of fielding practice.

Sure enough, the Diamonbacks showed up for fielding practice and there were zero snagging opportunities until the Diamondbacks finished and when they did, they didn’t toss anything up to the only Diamonbacks “fan” within a mile of the dugout. I have no problem with fielding practice taking place AFTER bp but I just don’t understand why you have to cancel bp to make this happen. I however, am in no position to criticize, the Diamonbacks had been hitting wretchedly until that point and this series was the start of a run that separated them from the Giants in the NL West and will propbably get them into the playoffs. It just makes no sense to my limited knowledge of baseball. This was actually a first for me in that I bought seats on both sides of the Outfield. If you were following this adventure on the blog’s twitter account, you know that I was absolutely exhausted by the fifth inning. I repeat, THE FIFTH INNING. If I’m not mistaken, the reason I did this was because there were two righties on the hill and the established players on both teams (Justin Upton, Chris Young, Michael Morse, Ryan Zimmerman etc) were pure righties but had plenty of power lefties/switch hitters that almost only came in/hit lefty when there was a righty on the hill (Rick Ankiel, Danny Espinosa, Laynce Nix, Miguel Montero) those names but might be accurate but the point is the line-up was very mixed when it came to righties and lefties. The Diamondbacks were the  main cause of my exhaustion as Kirk Gibson thought it would be funny to see me run back and forth all night and stacked his lineup in the Righty-Lefty format. The Nationals almost did the same thing but they had a pocket of righties at the middle of the order because those were the players that belonged at the middle of the order.

I ended up so exhauted that I had to do a bit of guess work and just guess which hitters were more likely to hit a Home Run than the others. Had I actually followed the lineup, there would have been many a time that I started running to one side of the OF and a batter change would cause me to turn around the other way. On average, if I left right as the first batter got out, I got to the other side of the OF by the second pitche of the second batter’s At-Bat.

I didn’t catch anything but came within 20 feet of Laynce NIx’s 9th inning Home Run and got a ball after the game ended from the Diamondbacks’ bullpen catcher, Jeff Motuzas:

I also managed to snag a bag of peanuts from a couple who bought two bags but didn’t have room for the second:

Or as it is known in the dictionary Observing Baseball edition, dinner. I am glad I had something to eat because  this self-portrait sums up best how I was feeling a the moment:

Is it okay with everyone if I don’t write up the stats for the rest of the season? It has been uneventful to say the least and I am really more concerned with getting the entries up first than puting up my stats. If it is really important to you to see my stats, the best place to look at them by far is my mygameballs.com profile page which is linked to on the side bar on the right side of the screen and has better statistical categories than any I can think of—–>

7/31/11 Mets at Nationals: Nationals Park

It was a sunday day game so you know what that means:

Wait… no. This can’t be right. There are never cages set up on a Sunday day game. I must have looked in the wrong album. Wow!

Yes there was indeed batting practice as Garrett Meyer- recently back from a one game excursion to Philadelphia- so astutely noticed outside the gates. I would also like to thank him for providing me with a ticket. I had bought one but the printer in my Washington residence decided a great day to be unavailable.

As you can tell from that last picture, I was in the upper Right Field seats again. My first ball came when I was about to leave the section, but then a ball rolled almost to the wall. Rick Ankiel picked it up and let me share the dialogue that occured:

“Hey Rick!”

“What?”

“Can you toss me the ball, please?”

I couldn’t hear what he said that well next. So I said, “What?”

“Show me your muscle” he said raising his arm. I then raised my arm like his and he tossed me the ball. I appreciate his effort to be fan-friendly but that was kind of weird and over-the-top.

I then made my journey to left field:

This didn’t go as well as I planned it so I moved over to the Red Porch. After, of course, drooling over the baseballs in the bullpen and really wishing I had back-up rubber bands as I had lost the one on my glove a few minutes earlier:

In Center Field, a person was trying to get a ball by just the darling-est of means: “Hey [Brian Bixler], how much longer do you think you’re going to be with the Nats?” Surprisingly, Bixler did not throw him the ball. On the next ball, I simply gave my standard request for a ball with please at the end and I got the ball. After that though, Bixler told me that it was because I was polite. I guess you can be really sensitive to those things when you have just been called up (Bixler got called up when Jerry Hariston Jr. got traded in between my first and second games here at Nationals Park).

My third ball of the game came when I moved back to Left Field and Jose Martinez fielded a ball towards the right of the bullpen right in front of it. There must have been at least 15 other voices but he surprisingly reacted to my spanish leaning out the place where I had lost my retainer the day before. He then threw a perfect strike to me and I vanished back up to the second deck:

There that same bullpen catcher person that doesn’t show up on the coaches roster threw a ball up to a kid. It went over him right to me and I caught it and handed it to the kid as it was obviously intended for him. This was the kid:

As you can tell,(if you’ve ever gone to Nationals Park) I was heading back over to Left Field. This was because batting practice had ended and I was moving over to the bullpen to get a ball from the pitcher warming up in the bullpen whose name escapes me. After realizing that it was going to take a while for him to finish and hearing that the rest of the park was now open, I ran over to foul ground on the first base side because I had seen all the balls in the Right Field stands picked up by the guards and I knew where a ball was in foul ground. Sure enough my ball waited for me:

This was easy for two reasons 1) half of the fans were racing to find balls in the Right Field stands like pictured in the upper part of the last picture and 2) the other half was racing to get a good spot by the dugouts for Signature Sunday.

Back over to the other side of the ballpark, a couple of pitchers were warming up and I got Mike Pelfrey to throw me a ball:

If you look closely, you can see that same pitcher (whoever he is) was still warming up in the bullpen. I then tried to help the kid in the last picture to get a ball from either Ryota Igarashi or Pedro Beato but sadly neither ended up with the ball and I didn’t have a chance to use my linguistic skillz.

I did however get Ryota Igarashi to sign a ball of mine:

The man himself in behind the circle I drew as the crowd had engulfed him in that picture. It is a very interesting autograph, no? I wonder if all Japanese pitchers sign like that? It makes sense now but it just never occurred to me. As I was going through my baseballs to find a good one to get signed, I saw how scuffed up the ball I found was and took a picture. Here it is with where I found it in the background:

As far as the game was concerned, I once again sat in the Left Field seats where this was my view:

It was definitely a tale of two line-ups as the Nationals possessed a line-ups:

I actually apologize as I initially wrote this part in the last entry thinking it happened last game but it actually happened this game:

Nothing else came my way during the game except for a Scott Hariston Home Run which hit right where the dotted arrows show the flight of the ball:

 

When it touched down, it hit off a fan’s (pointed out by the solid arrow) hands, fluttered in the air and got caught by that same fan. You could hear the crowd about to boo him but then cheer him when he caught it the second time.

The Hariston Home Run was one of two he hit in the game, providing the Mets with their only runs of the game and forcing the game into extra innings where the Nationals loaded the bases against Bobby Parnell through a series of Mets errors (not the statistical category this included Parnell hitting a batter and such) and getting a walk of hit through the use of the Baltimore chop.

 

After the game ended, I got one of the bullpen catchers, Eric Langill, to throw me a ball from the bullpen bag. Whoomp here it is:

One of the things that I do like about the Mets is that their bullpen bag is full of rubbed up balls so the pitchers don’t have to make an adjustment when they come into the game. Other teams probably do this too but the Mets are the first team I have noticed doing it.

 

STATS:

  • 7 balls at this game (6 pictured because I gave 1 away)
numbers 175-182 for my career (notice the Mets bullpen balls?):
  • 121 balls in 27 games this season= 4.48 balls per game
  • 53 straight games with at least 1 ball
  • 22 straight on the road
  • 18 straight games with at least 2 balls
  • 3 games straight with at least 7 balls
  • 6 straight games at Nationals Park with at least 1 ball
  • 37 balls in 6 games at Nationals Park = 6.17 balls per game
  • 25 balls on this specific excursion = 8.333333 balls per game
  • 7 balls* 25,307 fans= 177,149 competition factor
  • Time at Game 11:01- 5:45= 6 hours 44 minutes

Atlanta Braves Offseason Recap and Preview

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At least they lost to the eventual champions.

Grade: B

Notable Additions:
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Dan Uggla, Scott Linebrink, and George Sherill.
Notable Subtractions:
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Billy Wagner, Derrek Lee, Kyle Farnsworth (because it actually helps the team), Melky Cabrera, Omar Infante, Rick Ankiel, Matt Diaz, and Takashi Saito.


Why?: When macroscopically looking at this list the grade should have been waaay lower but what I also see are young players coming up that are going to replace the key players lost in the Notable subtractions column.

For example, Billy Wagner is going to be replaced by Craig Kimbrel. He was inconsistent in his walks (16) but made up for it in strikeout (40). Even more amazing, he did it in 20.2 innings pitched. Another being, Derrek Lee is to be replaced by Freddie Freeman. I don’t know that much about him because he only had 24 at-bats in the Majors but if you haven’t heard he was Jason Heyward’s roommate in either college or the minor leagues.

The big acquisition was Dan Uggla, who I personally think will kill in his first year with the Braves. The Braves also don’t have to face him because I don’t remember the exact numbers but he hit his best at Turner Field because of the dimensions and lack of wall in left.


Predicted Record Range: 91-96 They have plugged holes with new talent and have a better line-up than last year. I expect to be in this range for the season.

At long last the entry is finished. Again, due to picture uploading problems.

Up Next: Florida Marlins
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