Results tagged ‘ Erik Jabs ’

Ballhawk and Junior Ballhawk of the Year Ballot

I know that one’s ballot for voting on these awards is usually a private matter, but I think I’m going to go ahead and make my ballot as well as the reasoning behind it so some other voters out there can get at least one other person’s perspective on the voting besides their own. I am by no means the “right” way to vote on the award; simply, my way of voting is *a* way of voting on the award, and I thought it’d be fun to share it.

Also, even though the ballot is restricted to three candidates, I’m going to give my top-5 for each award, since I think there are many more than six total worthy candidates. The name in parentheses is the person’s mygameballs.com username, since you’ll need that to vote for them.

Ballhawk of the Year ballot

1. Greg Barasch (gbarasch)

20120710-091158.jpg

I must admit, I didn’t have Greg in either of my top-2 ballot spots last year, and despite having only 13 more baseballs than last year total, I bumped Greg up to the top spot because he still had an excellent year. Unlike last year, Greg beat every single ballhawk on the site in head-to-head match-ups (which you can check for yourself by clicking here). Not only that, but he averaged almost a whole Ball Per Game (.93 to be specific) higher than anyone else on the site. He also had by far the best rate of double-digit games (1:3) of anyone on the site. The only thing that made me hesitant to put him at the top of my ballot was his lack of game balls, but he dominated his part of ballhawking enough this year to more than make up for that in my opinion. Not to mention, he did all of this going to a majority of his games in New York, both of the stadiums inside of which are tough places to snag baseballs and have a bunch of competition to deal with.

2. Alex Kopp (akopp1)

8213 Alex + Spot

He perhaps didn’t have the average or total baseball count of other candidates, but like Greg, he dominated his own part of the ballhawking top-10. He had more game home run snags than anyone in the top-10 ballhawks. Heck, he almost had as many (8) as the rest of the top-10 combined (10). And also like Greg, I had my reservations about putting Alex so high up, but he also attended 92% of his games at Oriole Park at Camden Yards, which has one of the larger constituencies of ballhawk competition in the country. It was not uncommon for him to have two or three ballhawks up on the flag court competing with him for game home runs. If he had the ballpark to himself, he would easily have double-digit home run numbers. Even as it is, he had a game to game home run ratio (8.25:1) almost three times better than the next best ballhawk in the top-10 (23.25:1). That’s amazing.

3. Zack Hample (zackhample)

Zack H Photo

He got beat out in terms of total baseballs by Erik Jabs 723-710. However, he made up for it in my mind by out-snagging Erik in game home runs (4-0), double digits games (27-23. Despite going to 14 less games), and Balls Per Game average (7.63-6.76). He is probably the most rounded of any of the candidates for the award.

4. Erik Jabs (ErikJ)

Erik Picture

Besides the number two baseball snagger, Erik almost doubled the baseball count of anyone else on the site. That alone would be enough to get him into the top-3 if it weren’t for some great years by other ballhawks. Pretty much the only reason Erik did not make my personal BotY ballot is the lack of strength in the other statistical categories. However, it should be noted that he ballhawks in the ballpark with perhaps THE toughest day-in-day out competition in the country in PNC Park. He also leaves games right after batting practice, so that makes all of his numbers that much more impressive since he doesn’t have time during the games to pad his stats at all. I don’t think the magnitude of his feats should be minimized at all because of the fact that I have him in the four spot.

5. Rick Gold (JQFC)

8213 Rick Arriving

To the outsider, Rick and his 3.23 Balls Per Game paired with his 265 baseballs might seem like a guy who just went to a ton of games in order to get a bunch of baseballs and get into the top-10. Well an outsider wouldn’t know that Rick only goes after hit baseballs. For a ballhawk, averaging anything that nears 3.00 Balls Per Game is a great season, so Rick’s 3.23 isn’t unheard of, but still a phenomenal season. You may be thinking, “Getting three and a quarter hit baseballs in a batting practice isn’t hard to do.” Well the problem with that is this was Rick’s *average* for all of the games he went to. This would be difficult average with regular batting practices, but one has to also keep in mind that this average also includes batting practices that have been rained out–which Rick is particularly prone to since he plans his games out often weeks in advance and doesn’t skip games when he learns the weather isn’t going to be ideal. Well all of those games are automatic zeroes for Rick barring a game home run snag. Speaking of which, Rick might’ve been higher on this list had he had a normal year of his in terms of game home run snags, but he had some tough luck and only snagged three. That is still the third best amongst the top-10 baseball snaggers on the site.

Junior Ballhawk of the Year ballot

1. Grant Edrington (fireant02)

Grant

With 2013 essentially being his rookie year ballhawking, Grant started off his season slowly, but then he picked it up and snagged the most baseballs of any junior ballhawk with 102, outpacing the nearest competitor by almost thirty baseballs. And he also accomplished what almost no other junior ballhawks did by snagging a game home run. He all of which whilst battling the very tough OPACY ballhawk competition.

2. Paul Kom (paaoool123)-

Paul

He snagged an impressive 73 baseballs in 19 games. The majority of which were at the not-very-friendly Target Field.

3. Josh Herbert (PGHawkJosh)

Snagged an impressive 48 baseballs for a junior ballhawk, but even more impressively did so in just eight games to get him the highest Balls Per Game average amongst junior ballhawks.

4. Maddie Landis (angrybird447)

Maddie

Like Grant, this was also essentially her rookie season, so 54 baseballs in 14 games is really impressive.

5. Harrison Tishler (htishler)

Harrison

One of the few “veterans” on the junior circuit, Harrison didn’t make it into the upper echelon in terms of total baseball snagging with his 43 baseballs, but did so in far fewer games this season than his peer, going to only 9 games all season.

If you want to, you can leave your ballot as a comment, but don’t feel like you have to. You may also notice that I made the “RE: Ballhawk of the Year Parts I and II” private, so in order to still have the comments that accumulated there somewhere public, here are pictures of all three sets of comments and my responses:

Chris:

Chris comment and response

Tony:

Tony comment and response

Wayne:

Wayne comment and response

7/24/13 Pirates at Nationals: Nationals Park

While the same guys were at the game who were there the previous day, the District of Columbia also had a new ballhawk face this game:

72413 Greg and Mateo

That on the left would be Greg Barasch, an excellent ballhawk from New York who also happens to be my former neighbor. So if the competition the day before wasn’t bad enough, the mygameballs.com leader in Balls Per Game was now being thrown in the mix. However, I will spoil the entry a bit and tell you that I snagged more baseballs  during this game than I did the previous. I probably should have snagged more baseballs than anybody besides Greg, but I have one person to blame for this: myself.

When the gates opened, we actually had another ballhawk you may remember from past entries, Dave Butler. I would mention/link him a lot more, but he still has yet to get a mygameballs.com account. Anyway, he’s there for pretty much every Nationals game, so if you see a man wearing a San Fransisco Giants hat chasing baseballs during BP, that’s probably Dave. He, Erik, and Greg all headed for the Red Seats, so it was a no-brainer for Rick and I to pick the seats in straight-away left for the first group–which happens to be pitcher’s BP:

72413 Ballhawks

During this, I forget which pitcher it was hit a ball just to my left. I tracked the ball, put my glove up, but The ball bounced in and out of the glove and onto the ground, where another fan picked it up. I (not-so-)secretly blame Greg for this, because it was with my lefty glove that the ball bounced out. When I first got the glove in the Winter, I first tested it out with Greg and his dad in Riverside Park. There he told me, “I don’t know. I think you’re going to drop one because of the glove and then go back to your normal one.” Well I hadn’t been to the same game as Greg too often this season, but this being the first time the glove had failed me so far was too coincidental. GREG WAS BEHIND THIS SOMEHOW, I TELL YOU! It was right after that I switched to my right-handed glove. (Well it’s actually technically my mom’s glove, but that’s a story for another blog entry.)

With this glove in hand, I went over to right field for the Zimmerman, Werth, and I believe Bernadina. Anyway, just as Rick told me that Werth can go opposite field, Werth did just that. Rick was in front of me, and the ball appeared to be falling short of me, so I figured my chances of getting the ball were gone. Surprisingly, though, Rick misjudged the ball by running too far to his left, so I now had a window of opportunity that I used to catch the ball on the fly for my first of the day:

72413 Ball 1

My next baseball came when the Pirates started hitting. Normally what I do when the opposing team starts hitting at Nationals Park is go down the third base line and try to get baseballs from the players of said team who are warming up. I didn’t get anything from these players, but as I saw a ball roll into the net that the Nationals have set up for BP to “protect their fans from projectiles leaving the field” (a.k.a. themselves from any possible liability that may come if a fan were to get hit by said projectile.) There was another guy about my age right on top of it, and I told him that I would get the ball for him if he moved out of the way. My plan was to cast the net the Nationals had set up, as if fishing, to reel the ball in close enough where I could pick it up off the ground. As I was doing this, a second baseball rolled to the same spot, so the guy said, “Oh, now we can both have one.” What I should have done was said yes, but offered to pick up both baseball, since I was taller. I mean the reason for me picking up both wouldn’t have actually been because I was taller; it would have been because I could then count both baseball even though I would end up giving one away. Instead, dumb me reeled both in and let him pick up his baseball as  picked up mine:

72413 Ball 2

(For the record, my hand is the one on the left. You can tell that from the green “UMN #GetActive” wristband. I’ve pretty much worn it every day since November, 6, 2012.) I then met up with Erik, who was also trying to get a toss-up form Pirate relievers. As he left the section, he did a brief run-through of the names of the Pirate pitchers. This served me well because my third ball of the day came when I asked Jeff Locke by name for a baseball in the Red Seats. Erik gets the huge assist on that one because Locke was not responding at all to the tons of kids requesting a ball, but when I said his name, Locke’s head shot up and he tossed me the baseball before I could get the rest of the request out:

72413 Ball 3

That was it for BP. My next baseball came after BP at the Pirates bullpen. Both Erik and I ended up there after I alerted him to two baseballs that Bryan Morris had under-thrown into the  gap in front of the Red Seats. Erik was already sitting down behind the bullpen when batting practice ended, so I went over to him and told him to hurry up because I was afraid the groundskeepers were going to get the baseballs out of the gap, since they were already rolling the equipment off the field. When we got there, though, the baseballs were still there, so groundskeepers were no longer the problem. The problem was you’re not exactly allowed to retrieve baseballs out of this gap. So I first tried to shield Erik’s string from the usher, but when the usher–who I know–came down to check tickets, I tried to distract her from the glove trick by talking to her until Erik had reeled up the two baseballs. I’m pretty sure it would have worked ceteris paribus, but there were a ton of kids right in front of the usher begging Erik for the baseballs, so she realized what he was doing. Thankfully, by the time she went over to confront him, he had already pulled in the two baseballs, and got away without punishment by emphasizing the fact that he had given both baseballs away to kids–which he had.

After that, Euclides Rojas tossed me a baseball when Francisco Liriano finished throwing his bullpen session. I’m pretty sure Erik would have gotten the ball, since he told me that Rojas has tossed him about 20 baseballs in 2013, but he had left by that point because he had to leave the next morning from Pittsburgh to go to Miami and see the Pirates there. So as a a product of that, I got this guy:

72413 Ball 4

As for the game, I tried doing the same thing as the previous game and studying for my driving written test, but it was an absolute failure because I was too busy eating two bags of shelled peanuts a nice usher I know that works in the Diamond Club gave me. But don’t worry, I ended up passing. The test-taker needed to get a minimum of 23 questions right, and I got just that. (I had heard somewhere else that it was 24, so I actually thought I had already failed for the last 6 questions and was just finishing the test for fun at that point.)As a result of all of that I got this guy:
72413 Learners Permit

(As I write this I have just driven for my first time in years with my new permit, and I have to say; it was much less terrifying than I thought it would be given that it was my first time with a permit.) At the end of the game, I headed down to the dugout:
72413 Dugout

And there I got my fifth and final ball of the day from home plate umpire Mike Estabrook:

72413 Ball 5

And if you’re wondering, the four of us ballhawks snagged a combined for 23 total baseballs. Greg and Erik snagged 9 and 6, respectively despite both leaving the game early, I snagged 5, and Rick snagged 3, but his stats are always more impressive since he goes for pretty much only hit baseballs.

STATS:

  • 5 Baseballs at this Game (4 pictured because I gave 1 away)

72413 Baseballs

Numbers 582-586 for my life:
72413 Sweet Spots

  • 140 Balls in 35 Games= 4.00 Balls Per Game
  • 5 Balls x 33,636 Fans=168,180 Competition Factor
  • 97 straight Games with at least 1 Ball
  • 173 Balls in 39 Games at Nationals Park= 4.44 Balls Per Game
  • 31 straight Games with at least 1 Ball at Nationals Park
  • Time Spent On Game 2:57-11:29= 8 Hours 32 Minutes

7/23/13 Pirates at Nationals: Nationals Park

While I accidentally missed out on the first game of the series, I got to the gates of Nationals Park for the second game of their series with the Pirates, and look who was at the gate awaiting me:

72313 Opening Picture

Left to right, that would be:

1. Myself.

2. Erik Jabs- The current mygameballs.com season leader with 446 baseballs this, who has also snagged 2,602 baseballs in his lifetime.

3. Rick Gold- A ballhawk/ employee of MLB.com who is slightly behind Erik in both baseball snagging categories I mentioned in his description.

Suffice to say, I was way out of my league, as is the case when most ballhawks are in the same ballpark as I am. For the first fifteen minutes, though, I was holding my own. Actually, I’m pretty sure I snagged three baseballs before either of them had snagged a single baseball.

Like I usually do for pitcher’s BP, I went to straight-away left:

72313 LF

Up to that point, the only pitcher Rick and I had never gotten  a ball from that had been up in the majors for any considerable amount of time was Jordan Zimmerman. So when he was up, I relaxed a bit. Sure enough, though, he launched the furthest-hit ball I’ve seen him hit. Naturally, I was taken back by how far the ball was traveling, so I ran back up the steps. However, although the ball was hit hard and high by Zimmerman’s standards, by the time I had run into a row, I realized the ball was falling short, so I wasn’t able to catch the ball on the fly. Instead I watched it drop in front of me and picked it up for my first of the day:

72313 Ball 1

I mean yeah I got the ball, but that misread had me feeling just absolutely awful about how the rest of the day was going to go. The next baseball, though, would have me feeling even worse. After the pitcher’s BP, all of us ballhawks did a musical chairs of sorts with the sections we were inhabiting. Said game of musical chairs ended with me in the Red Seats. There, I saw a ball get hit into the section of field between the Red Seats and right field seats. When I saw a Nationals player going to retrieve it, I ran over to the corner spot of the section. I reacted to him walking over so quickly, in fact, that I neglected to look at if there was anything in my way in the row of seating I was running through. Normally seats in stadiums flip up automatically when someone’s not sitting in them. One of the seats in this row, though, was the exception to that rule. Someone had sat in the seat earlier and it was left down. So as I ran through the row, I was taken out by said seat. The Nationals player was still walking, though; so I immediately got up from a fall that I would have otherwise taken my time in getting up from and asked this player if he could toss me the ball:

72313 Ball 2

He wasn’t wearing his jersey at the time, but with the help of Erik Jabs, we figured out it was Ian Krol, since the only other lefty pitcher on the Nationals roster, I believe at the time, was Fernando Abad.

Us ballhawks then did our game of musical chairs once more, which had me in right field. There I got my third and final ball of the day when Gio Gonzalez overthrew these people and I picked it up to give it to them:

72313 Ball 3 People

The other two ballhawks then went on to snag a combined 14 baseballs to my none. My only contribution to anyone’s stats from this point on revolved around this:

72313 Gap

See, while I used to have a glove trick, it started becoming more trouble than it was worth, so I disassembled, and am thus currently without a retrieval device that is my own. So when I saw a ball go into the gap, I sent out this tweet warning the two other ballhawks:

72313 First Tweet

And then this one when another baseball went into the gap:72313 Second Tweet

Neither of them read it, but Erik was the first one to come over, so I pointed both out to him, and he reeled them in with his glove trick as I just stood off to his side and blocked the view of his string from the usher at the top of the section.

There was then another baseball that got dropped or hit in there, so while Erik was in the seats in straight-away left, I waved him over and he fished the ball out of the gap. And that was it. Erik and I went to the bullpen after BP, where he got a grounds crew guy to toss him a ball, and we watched Gerrit Cole warm up. But after that, he left to spend time with his family in Annapolis, and I watched the game in left field as I read this:

72313 Drivers Manual

I still put my glove on for righties, but I was scheduled to take my driving test three days from this game, so I figured it would be a good time to actually start studying since I hadn’t at all previous to that point. And as bland as it can be for some people, Nationals Park is still a pretty great place to watch a baseball game:

72313 View from LF

Then again, I think I would talk differently sitting in the 400 level every game.

STATS:

  • 3 baseballs at this game (2 pictured because I gave 1 away)

72313 Baseballs

Numbers 579-581 for my career:

72313 Sweet Spots

  • 135 Balls in 34 Games= 3.97 Balls Per Game
  • 3 Balls x 32,976 Fans=98,928 Competition Factor
  • 96 straight Games with at least 1 Ball
  • 168 Balls in 38 Games at Nationals Park= 4.42 Balls Per Game
  • 30 straight Games with at least 1 Ball at Nationals Park
  • Time Spent On Game 2:58-11:00= 7 Hours 2 Minutes
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