Archive for the ‘ Dailies ’ Category

MLB to Get Rid of Expanded Replay

Okay, I don’t usually do these “right after the story breaks” type stories and I do promise that I’ll get into other entries that I’ve said I’ll write–like my days at the SABR Analytics conference–once I’m less bombarded by things, but this was just too big of a story for me to not write about. Anyways, let’s get into the entry:

First let’s establish that you know what happened. Baseball has long been behind the curve in terms of instant replay. In 2008, Major League Baseball first instituted replay as a means for overruling questionable home run calls. In January of 2014, however, the MLB clubs  ruled unanimously to expand replay to the point where it was usable int other facets of the game such as safe/out calls, fair foul calls not on home runs, and catch/no-catch calls. This system went into place on Opening Day of 2014. (Or yesterday if you’re reading this the day it got published.) After seeing the system, though, commissioner Bud Selig essentially “Scrooged” the grand opening this morning after it was put into play:

budseligbanner

He said, “I must admit I was hesitant going into the experiment, and I will allow expanded replay to continue for the remainder of the season. I will allow myself to be swayed by how it turns out in the future, but from what I have seen of the expanded replay and challenging system, I am very certain that my last decision as acting commissioner will be to rid Major League Baseball of [expanded] instant replay to restore the purity and magic of the game of baseball.”

It is not surprising that this decision immediately came under fire. One of Selig’s main critics was Joe Maddon:

joe-maddon

He said, “I don’t care how much I get fined by the league for saying this. They could fine me my entire salary for all I care. What the man who calls himself the commissioner of baseball says he is planning to do is absolutely idiotic. This is like a mom who got outvoted by her kids and husband so she let’s them got have ice cream one night just to prove that she’s nice and open but then gets whiny and gets what she wants just because she’s the mom. He’s supposed to be the man who knows more than anyone what’s best for the game of baseball, but seems to be pulling it in the exact opposite direction as of late.

Executive Vice-President of Baseball Operations, Joe Torre also remarked on the matter:

Torre Sad Face

He said, “I’m disappointed Bud decided to take this route because of how far along in the process we’ve come, but ultimately, he is the one who knows what’s best for the league. He’s been around this game for many, many years and we have to trust that what his decisions are will be what drives baseball forward in the future. From talking to him personally, his main concern is that baseball is becoming too indistinguishable from the other sports, so he wasn’t to keep the parts of baseball that make baseball uniquely baseball. This is one of those things and he thought it would be best to remove it from the game of baseball.”

 

Now for my personal opinion. If I had to line up with any of the three people I quoted, it would probably have to be Maddon. There is no “magic” that getting calls wrong preserves about baseball. The fact that a man who is in charge of a league takes such a resource away from it is ludicrous. I personally didn’t even know he could do that since the clubs voted it into existence in the first place. My only consolation is that Selig will be retiring at the end of the year and a hopefully more open commissioner will be taking his place and hopefully making reinstating replay as his first act as commissioner to spite Selig. Anyways, here are all of the sources I used to write this article:

Fox Sports Article

Interview with Joe Maddon

Statement from Bud Selig

Response by Joe Torre

 

10 Things I Learned at MIT Sloan Analytics Conference 2014- Day 2

This happened  two weeks ago, but since I’m at the SABR analytics conference, I figured I should do my second list of items I learned at the MIT sports analytics conference, especially since I learned more than I did the first day.

  1. The analytics community in baseball has done a great job in terms of research, but it still has to get implemented. That said, people doing the analytics need to keep in mind that there are a lot of things that go from the analysis to implementing it on the field.
  2. Health analysis is the next frontier in baseball. (Bill James)- He was talking about the fact that there has been so much work done in statistical analysis that being able to tell who is more or less likely to get injured or stay healthy is going to be the next break through age in terms of competitive advantage in the way that the statistics was for the Moneyball era. Speaking of Moneyball…
  3. When Moneyball was written, we had two percent of the data that we have now. (Bill James)
  4. Jose Altuve is an exception in that he is the leader of the Astros team at a very young age. (Jeff Luhnow)
  5. Don’t be dogmatic about data. People are more likely to go through with something if they feel it’s their idea too, so walk  them through the whole process and talk their language.
  6. Nate Silver feels as though there should be a maximum of ten pitchers per team, and Rob Neyer added that to do such, MLB should liberalize promotion rules.
  7. The fact that driving is an option for everyone is absurd. (Malcom Gladwell)- He added that it’s a very complex task, so he has no clue why it is assumed that everyone can do it.
  8. Boys are socialized to like what it is they’re good at whereas girls are to think that they like what they like regardless of what they’re good at. (Malcom Gladwell)
  9. 100% of NBA fans between the ages of 25 and 29 have watched a game with a second screen present. (Those polled anyway. I don’t actually buy that EVERY fan in that age range has done so.
  10. This generation are the most entitled, demanding customers in history, so you have to provide a unique, customized experience.

Also, if you want to see any of the pictures I took at this day of the conference, I have uploaded them as well as the pictures from day 1 onto the Facebook page. Right now I am currently at the SABR baseball analytics conference, so I am going to get started on those entries in 3, 2, 1, now.

10 Things I learned at MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference 2014- Day 1

Since I have no interest in writing the full-fledged entries I’ve done the past, and I actually wouldn’t be able to for this day, since I missed most of it because I had to Skype into a 2.5 hour class I was missing in Minnesota, I decided to just impart some of the things I learned from each of my two days at the conference. I will also do this same kind of entry for tomorrow at the conference.

  1. Coaches/Managers like to have the illusion of control, but chaos is often helpful (via Bill James). For example, Jeff Van Gundy’s most effective play when with the Rockets was labeled “random” where the play just broke down and the offense played randomly. (via Daryl Morey)
  2. Many sports suffer from it, but in the 1950′s, baseball thought it was a perfect sport and suffered greatly because of it. (via Bill James) He also added the tidbit that you would think people would be over the DH rule when it happened 41 years ago.
  3. Landon Donovan and Robbie Keane are by far the best duo in terms of working together in the MLS.
  4. People don’t like it when you talk over Skype while someone is giving a presentation about the bias umpires have when making different kinds of strike calls.
  5. Skyping on your phone takes up a huge amount of phone data and battery. (As in I drained my iPhone 5s’s battery in an hour and used 60% of my data plan in the same window of time that is usually allotted for a whole month’s worth of phone usage.)
  6. Stan Van Gundy likes numbers but doesn’t trust them at all. (via Stan Van Gundy)
  7. Paul George ran 138 miles in the 2014 season. (via Stan Van Gundy) who then went onto say, “why the heck do I want to know that?”
  8. Brad Stevens, despite being labeled an analytical coach feels he is given that title unfairly so. (via Brad Stevens)
  9. Jerry Rhinesdorf likes knowing things. And Phil Jackson knows more about basketball than him. (via Phil Jackson)
  10. Jonathan Kraft feels as though Tom Brady would still be a sixth-round draft pick if he were coming out of Michigan today.

And now here are some of the pictures I took from the events:

IMG_2497 IMG_2500 IMG_2511 IMG_2512 IMG_2514

I definitely will have a better (read: completely legitimate) list of things I learned, but again, I missed a bunch of panels and didn’t take particualrly good notes on the ones that I did attend. But until then, I’m going to take a brief nap that most people call a night’s sleep before heading out to tomorrow on the conference.

Dave St. Peter (President of the Minnesota Twins) Interview

I have an excessive amount of contact cards. The site I bought them from was having a huge sale, so I maybe went a little overboard and got myself enough to last me 30 years. (Seriously, if you ever see me in person, just ask me for one even if you know me.) A result of having so many contact cards is I use any chance I can get to get rid of them. During Twinsfest, that meant leaving them everywhere and probably driving some Target Field janitor insane. But I also gave them out to some of the people related with the team (3 in total) in hopes that they would get back to me and it would result in me interviewing them for this blog. Now while Mr. St. Peter actually didn’t take my card, he was them only one to this point who has gotten back to me. The result of talking to him and his assistant was I was able to take a half-hour off of my internship with Minnesota United FC and interview him via phone. Here’s how it went:

Mateo Fischer: What would you say are the advantages and disadvantages of the Twins having the market that they have where they are essentially THE team for a tri-state area with a strong presence in others but with none of those having a particularly dense population?

Dave St. Peter: Well…you know I think that’s always been the reality for the Twins. We’re very much a regional team. I think we embrace that. We, you know, are very cognizant of the geographic area, which is rather larger, but we also recognize that there’s a significant part of that geographic area that’s more rural in nature. And thus is less densely populated. This is not a small market overall. We play in the 15th largest television market in the country because of the Minneapolis-St. Paul DMA. That makes it more of a mid-sized market, and we understand that part of our market is our region, but we don’t approach it as if we are a small-market team. We approach it as though we are a middle-market franchise, and so that’s more of the filter by which we make business decisions.

MF: How difficult is it to line up concerts at Target Field with the Twins season being in the summer when an outdoor concert makes most sense and having a ton of competition for artists bookings with all of the concert venues in Minneapolis including even your next-door neighbor, the Target Center?

DSP: Well certainly our primary focus here at Target Field is playing baseball. Make no mistake. From time to time, there are going to be opportunities to look for non-baseball events. We certainly are going to be opportunistic in those opportunities, but it will never be and has never been our primary focus.

MF: Do you work together with Terry Ryan on a joint budget for the team from the money you are given to work with by Jim Pohlad or do you each have your separate budget that is individual to your own facet of the team?

DSP: We have a single budget as a business. Ultimately I am responsible for that budget as the President of the baseball team, reporting to Jim Pohlad. As a part of that single budget there are line items devoted to, obviously, expenses for all of the various departments within the Twins organization. Obviously the biggest of those and the highest profile budget is that which Terry Ryan manages for us in term of the baseball budget. That includes Major League payroll. That includes a budget for international and domestic draft or signings; amateur talent. It includes minor league operations, etc.

MF: So does Terry have to run that budget by you?

DSP: As long as Terry stays within the budget, we have hired good baseball people that are hopefully going to make good baseball decisions. So it’s a highly collaborative process because of the people we have in place. Terry certainly has a high level of communication with me on baseball-related matters just as I have a high level of communication with him on business-related matters. But at the end of the day, Terry is responsible for managing the baseball part of the budget. And if his decision extend to multi-year contracts and certainly get to a level of long-term commitment, more than likely those types of contracts will stimulate an incremental level of discussion with myself and the owner of the baseball team.

MF: What was the main concern of the front office when thinking of Target Field as a concept? For example, upon its completion, it was the greenest ballpark in the majors, but would you say that was emphasized more than, say, concession accessibility?

DSP: I would say that all-together was our focus, but it was mainly the game day experience. You know for twenty-eight years, we played in the corner of a football stadium at the Metrodome, where we had some very good teams, but it was not a great place to play baseball. So the number one focus when coming to Target Field was all about just that: the ability to present the game the way it was meant to be presented. So elements around the game such as accessibility, greening, the urban footprint, transit, and all of those things were important, but were only one part of the puzzle when looking at the game day experience.

MF: Now besides Target Field, what is your favorite stadium in baseball to have visited and for what reasons?

DSP: It’s hard to compete with Fenway Park and Wrigley Field because of the history, and their beauty and intimacy. Of the new stadiums, for me, it would still be Camden Yards because of the setting. If there were one on the West Coast that comes to mind, it would be AT&T Park in San Francisco, because of the setting.

MF: Based on the feedback you received about Twinsfest 2014, what are some areas you look to improve on in 2015 if any?

DSP: Too early to tell. We’re still studying the results of this year’s Twinsfest, looking to get a better idea of what did and did not work. I’d rather not go into specifics here today, but we do think there are ways we can improve. I’m pretty optimistic there are ways we can improve going forward.

MF: Because it was a venue you owned and not the Vikings’, did you save any money in operations cost that was then able to add to the amount of money donated to the Twins community fund?

DSP: Yes and no. It swings both ways. There are actually ways where it was more expensive to hold here at Target Field that it would’ve been at the Metrodome.

MF: Regarding the Twins community fund, most stadiums have a strikeout counter that determines the amount of money donated to a charity. Why was it that the Twins decided to go the route of Strikeout ALS?

DSP: We have a long history, unfortunately, with that organization that dates back to Kent Hrbek and his father passing away from ALS. So we’ve had a long relationship of fundraising for them. Minnesota Air Carrier is a longstanding corporate partner of the Twins and also a longstanding partner of ALS organizations, so we tied those two things together.

MF: Since you grew up there and went to UND, were there any minute cultural differences you had to pick up coming to Minnesota from North Dakota, or are they pretty similar?

DSP: No. People in this part of the region are very similar. There is perhaps a difference between the urban people who grew up in Minneapolis or St. Paul, which might change things compared to rural out-of-Minnesota, or North Dakotans, but I think that people come from the same place in terms of values, and in terms of hardiness, and in terms of dealing with four seasons. In the end, we find a lot in common between Twins fans whether they come from Minnesota, North or South Dakota, Western Wisconsin, or Northern Iowa.

MF: Twinsfest is a truly unique experience with it being three days of fanfest. Would you say that there is anything else that makes Twinsfest unique?

DSP: Just the number of players available. There’s not another team in the game that is going to deliver as many players to their home market during the offseason like we do during Twinsfest. That’s the biggest thing we do that is unique to Twinsfest.

Twinsfest 2014 Extras

In addition to doing formal tours of Twinsfest 2014 like I showed you in the last entry, I also did a couple other videos I thought you might want to check out. The first is a three-day vlog I filmed throughout my time at Twinsfest:

And the second is a video of two interviews I did on the second day of Twinsfest with my friend Jonathan and a fan of the blog, Nate, who arranged for us to meet up interestingly enough via Instagram comment. I apologize for the video in this one not filling up the entire window. I don’t know why that happened:

Also at Twinsfest I got to talk to Dave St. Peter, President of the Twins, which ultimately ended with me being able to interview him via phone, which will be my next entry after this one. After that, I should maybe get back to normal offseason entries before the season starts. Thank you for those who have stuck with me throughout me having school and being generally busy these past few weeks.

Twinsfest 2014 Tours

With Twinsfest moving from its usual home at the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome–which was getting demolished as Twinsfest took place–to Target Field, there obviously needed to be a restructuring of the Twinsfest to be able to hold it indoors away from the Minnesota cold. Thus, one of my projects coming into Twinsfest was to document this new set-up for anyone who was curious about how everything was crammed into Target Field.

There were three levels to the new Twinsfest set-up–with their elevator floors next to them:

3. Suite Level.

2. Club Level.

0. Main Concourse (Only used as an entrance to and exit from Twinsfest. Nothing was actually held there.)

-2. Service Level.

The first day of Twinsfest, I went with Paul Kom, and my college friend Tony Blustein. That day, Paul and I filmed two of the levels. One for each of our channels/blogs and featured each other in them.  The next day I went with another college friend who you may more readily recognize, Jonathan, and I did the final level.

Now here from the top level down, are the tours of the floors of Twinsfest:

Suite Level:

Club Level:

Service Level:

I do have more footage I have to edit that I filmed at Twinsfest. That will be the next entry where I interviewed two people about there experiences at Twinsfest (first video) and then a three-day vlog of my time at Twinsfest (second video). But until then, keep voting for what you want to see on the blog after that in this poll and leave comments for what concepts you would the new blog icon:

My Favorite MLB Teams

While I’ve always kind of known which teams I like and which I don’t–although even those have changed throughout the years–I truly have never ranked the teams 1-30 as to which I like better than others. So that’s what I’m going to do right now. (Disclaimer: This is a list of how I order the teams in the offseason of 2013-14. While most of my decision in where to put a team in the rankings is based off of the franchise itself, some of it is based on who is on the team right now, so these rankings are subject to change over time.)

1. Minnesota Twins-

My story with the Twins is that I grew up a Yankees fan being from New York, but being that I look at things from a GM’s perspective, I thought that being Brian Cashman and having a $200-million payroll would be a pretty boring job creatively since he could essentially buy any player he wanted to. In thinking this, I thought of a team who had success but doing so with a reduced payroll that required teams to build their team in an innovative way on a much smaller budget. Being as it was the mid-2000s, the Twins was a natural choice seeing as they were a constant playoff team with one of the lowest budgets in baseball. Now don’t get me wrong; there’s a different challenge in being the GM of the Yankees: you’re never allowed to take a year off having success to rebuild your core/farm system, but I was entranced by the building of a successful major league team from a solid minor league core.

2. Washington Nationals-

In going to a ton of games at Nationals Park in 2011 I fell in love with the core of players that went 80-81 as well as the people who inhabited it. Ever since then, I have been a really big fan of the players that made up the core of the teams in the next two years. And because of me falling in love with the Nationals Park environment for whatever reason as well as the people who made it such a special place, I became a fan of the franchise as a whole.

3. Tampa Bay Rays-

Much like the Twins, the Rays endeared themselves to me by being a team that built their team intelligently–allowing them to achieve repeated success on a payroll that can’t compare to that of a larger market team.

4. San Francisco Giants-

The Giants is an interesting case because it started as simply a liking of a specific player: Tim Lincecum. However, as I kept up with Lincecum more and more as he began to turn from the Washington kid who could pitch insanely fast for his size to a household name, I grew to have a liking fro the other players on the Giants as well. I think having shared a hotel with the players in Milwaukee and having a mini-conversation with a couple of them as well as having a personal memory of what Brian Wilson was like pre-beard may have contributed to this connection to the team, though.

5. Texas Rangers-

I truly have no idea how the Rangers managed to climb my list so high. I used to not really be a fan of them in their team with the two Rodriguezes, but as they turned towards a team that relied more on pitching *in addition to* the offense the Rangers always seemed to have, I really liked the teams that they constructed around 2009-10.

6. New York Yankees-

While they have fallen down my list and I hate the franchise past the team itself, they still are my childhood team that I can’t help to root for.

7. Philadelphia Phillies-

While it was not the beginning of my fandom of them, this certainly sealed it for me. They’d be higher on the list for me, but Phillies fans.

8. Toronto Blue Jays-

Part of me always sympathized with our neighbors to the north. Even when the Expos were still a team, I liked the Blue Jays a lot and always secretly as a Yankee fan hoped they would surge up and break the norm of the AL East standings for a while in the early 2000s–which was:

1. Yankees

2. Red Sox

3. Blue Jays

4. Orioles

5. Devil Rays

I just really always wanted them to have success, and this translated to a fandom of the team when they played teams that weren’t my top-of-the-line favorite teams.

9. Milwaukee Brewers-

My liking of the Brewers began in around 2008 when CC Sabathia joined the team for half a season and did amazing with being in attendance for what should have been a no-hitter, (I might write about this/do a video for a “Blast From the Baseball Past” entry) but then I just had a fandom for the Fielder and Braun teams. My fandom for the team, though, has lessened the past couple of years for obvious reasons regarding one or more of the aforementioned players.

10. Oakland Athletics-

(See Tampa Rays.)

11. Cincinnati Reds-

I think this is kind of a fusion of many of the various teams I have talked about to this point. So in part it’s like the Rays where I liked that a solid major league team was built from the pooling of major league talent, but it is also a lot like the Giants since I really like Joey Votto as a player.

12. Atlanta Braves-

I think this is Nationals-esque in that I loved Turner Field and its atmosphere. I also liked the core and became much more of a fan because of people I have met that are passionate about the Braves. And I can say that the fact that Julio Teheran plays for them doesn’t hurt them at all.

13. Arizona Diamondbacks-

This is one of the teams that I honestly don’t know why I like more than most teams. I’ve just always liked Diamondbacks teams (after the 2001 season, that is.) Yeah, I don’t know.

14. Seattle Mariners-

This has been mostly the product of running into very nice baseball people who are fans of the Mariners. I’m also a fan of how good of a pitching team they have been despite being offensively anemic the past seasons.

15. Baltimore Orioles-

Similarly to the Mariners, I just know a ton of awesome baseball people that are Orioles fans. In addition to that, their stadium is my favorite in baseball. I would say that really the only reason they’re this far down the list is that some Orioles fans became obnoxious as they began to climb out of the AL East cellar.

16. Detroit Tigers-

I know that I’m supposed to hate the Tigers as a Twins fan, but the fact that we beat them in the game 163 we played them helps and I always admired the teams that had success more than most of the teams I am supposed to dislike.

17. Pittsburgh Pirater-

I can pretty safely say that if I weren’t a ballhawk, this team would be lower on the list, but because of the big ballhawk following in Pittsburgh, I have kept up and liked the Pirates and it was incredibly fun watching them have success for the first time in over two decades last season.

18. Miami Marlins-

Ah the Marlins. Those poor souls. I always had an affinity for them especially teams with the 30+ homer infields of Uggla, Ramirez, Cantu, and Jacobs. That said, Jeffrey Loria has made this a team that I can’t root for over half of the other teams. They remain a team that I’m intrigued by and want to root for, and they would skyrocket up this list if Loria ever sold them and kept them in Miami, but right now they’re just not a team I can really get behind.

19. Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim-

I don’t know about this team. I want to like them in many respects, but they lost me when they started spending a bajillion dollars on free agents, trading for Vernon Wells, and then having success with not with their big free agent acquisitions but with the farm talent they had beforehand.

20. Colorado Rockies-

The Rockies are one of those teams I have a preference towards, but still in a kind of “eh” way. I’ve never disliked them really, but I’ve never really had any passion behind my support of them.

21. San Diego Padres-

I used to like them a lot more in the Trevor Hoffman era, but they’ve dropped a bit since then  not necessarily because their lack of success but the players behind these teams. They just haven’t been groups of guys that I’d like to get behind.

22. Cleveland Indians-

Again, never disliked them but never really liked them.

23. Houston Astros-

I actually like the group of people in this team and could see myself liking a lot in the years to come. That said, they have made some pretty bad decisions in the past and it was not a shock that they were as bad of a team as they have been.

24. Kansas City Royals-

I actually like this franchise in terms of their ballpark and look, but then there are the people behind the scenes that ruin this team for me. At the ballpark, I have not heard many positive things about their ushers, and behind the franchise, I disagree on many things with the GM of the team, Dayton Moore. I think that the team could have been competing a long time ago had it not been for his guidance.

25. St. Louis Cardinals-

The main reason for them being this far down the list is the fact that their fans claim incorrectly that they are definitely the “best fans in baseball.” While I don’t think there is a no-doubt group of the best fans in baseball, if my experience with Cardinals fans in baseball has taught me anything, it is that while the Cardinals fan base may be in the top-10, they are definitely not the no-doubt best fans in baseball they claim to be.

26. Chicago White Sox-

I was a fan of the 2005 Astros and 2008 Twins. Enough said.

27. New York Mets-

They’re the Mets. I don’t know how many things I have admired about the Mets the past five years. If it’s any indication, the rendition of “Meet the Mets” that I have adopted begins:

Beat the Mets,

Beat the Mets,

Step right up and,

Sweep the Mets

28. Los Angeles Dodgers-

While I have kind of liked the players on the Dodgers for stretches, their recent acquisition by the Kasten-Johnson group and metamorphosis into baseball’s new Yankees has really turned me off to them. I have disliked them sans Vin Scully for a much longer time than just that, but that’s the most recent thing that provides a rational reason for disliking them.

29. Chicago Cubs-

I have never had any appeal to the Cubs, and I’m not particularly found of how Cubs fans overreact to prospects as well as how in-your-face Cubs fans I have interacted with have been about the most minor successes. Granted, it’s a conditioning that has come with being the fan of a team who last won a World Series when one’s great-grandparents were your age.

30. Boston Red Sox-

This is partially because I grew up a fan of the Yankees, but I also do like their stadium and the atmosphere of it. However, I can’t get over the attitude of their owner John Henry that many fans have adopted without realizing the absurdity of it of that the Yankees have a ridiculous advantage in terms of having a humongous payroll. The reason this argument infuriates me is because for the longest time, there was a gigantic gap in payroll between the Red Sox and the third largest payroll. Thus it was the rich crying poor in order to gain sympathy. The second reason is because the Steinbrenner family is actually a middle-of-the-pack ownership group in terms of wealth. The reason they invest so much money into the team is because they value winning. Therefore, if John Henry truly wanted to win, he could spend the extra money and win. The problem is that if he didn’t win with this extra money invested, he would be losing money. However, George Steinbrenner was taking the same risk when he invested his extra money; it was just that Steinbrenner’s Yankees did win every season and could thus keep spending. So what Henry did by calling out Steinbrenner and the Yankees was criticized him/them for doing what he didn’t have the guts to do with the Red Sox in order to give his fans the winning such a great fan base deserved. However, being the fans that they were, many Red Sox fans backed their owner without truly understanding what was behind these claims.

So those were my favorite teams. I am by no means “right” in any of my judgements. Picking a favorite team–or in my case *teams*–is something of complete subjectivity and can be done for any number of reasons. Also, the next entry is me making a new Observing Baseball Logo. I would actually like to make a clarification. So it’s actually not the logo itself–this:

Just Logo

But it would actually be me remaking the icon itself, which is this:

Icon 5

But besides that, keep voting for your favorite entries. I should mention that I’ll be doing various entries for Twinsfest, but you can vote for the stuff you want to see besides this on the poll below:

New Years Thingamajig: 2014

First of all, sorry to everyone who is waiting for me to get caught up with the Observing Baseball Trivia leader board. I’ve been in New York doing something at all hours. I’ll get on that once I am out of New York and given some free time to work with.

Now, it is the new year, and that usually means that I make resolutions/goals for what I want to accomplish in the following year. But considering the fact that I checked my goals from last year yesterday for the first time in 11 months and saw how brutal my sticking to them was, I’m going to pass of on making a ton of them this year. Now the success rate for new year’s resolutions is about 12%, and I’m glad to say I passed that, but that’s also because I did a bunch without really thinking about them all year.

Anyway, I find myself in the very peculiar position of not really being sure what I’m going to be doing for the next year of my life (besides school). I mean I’m most likely going to be doing some sort of job-type thing to work towards my eventual career goal of being a general manager, but I’m not entirely sure what that’ll be. So I have no clue whether or if so how much I’ll be ballhawking. While it might’ve seemed terrifying to me a while ago, it actually is really freeing to me right now. A by-product of this, however, is that I can’t really make specific goals like last year. I also found out that the more resolutions I make, the harder it is to keep them. So what I’m going to do is fashion a list of all of my favorite ones from last year’s list and ones I thought of in thinking of good goals for the coming year.

Ballhawking:

  • Go to a new stadium-With 2013 came another year I didn’t visit a new stadium.

Writing:

  • Write more mygamballs.com columns than last year- For the record, three.

Video:

  • Do my previously-planned ballhawking videos- Highlight video, and an all-video ballhawking entry–even if it’s not mine.

Twitter:

  • Meet internet people- Because face-to-face is where it’s at.

Facebook:

Since I still don’t plan on using Facebook that much, I’m going to use this as a sort of wildcard slot.

  • Make whatever content creation I do in 2014 a more collaborative effort- It keeps things fresh, exposes people to new things, and to continue doing things on my own is to say that I am the best at what I do in all aspects of it, which is definitely not the case.

Instagram:

Another wild card here.

  • Keep making content and being creative about it–even if that means straying from baseball-related topics-It can be hard with school and things, but I do love creating stuff, and hopefully I can get better at doing it by continuing to create things but in different ways.

Vine:

  • Just keep doing it- The top viners are alive and well, but it feels like with an increase in the revine culture, smaller people are being left out. I want to keep that culture alive and well if only in my own small way.

And now, with it being the new year, here is my 2013 WordPress statistical report. It isn’t as traditionally successful as last year’s, but I also think I was a lot better about content creation last year:

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 28,000 times in 2013. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 10 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

Even though it has been technically 2014 for over 24 hours now, I may do one more year-end related thing. Either that or I’ll go on to the next entry in my winter writing ideas. That said, keep voting for the things you want to see this winter:

Observing Baseball Trivia 2013-14

Updated Standings:

1. Harrison Tishler-28.5

2.Quinn Imiola- 24.5

3. Nick Badders- 10.5

4. Larry-7

T-5. Paul Kom- 4

T-5. Maddie Landis- 3

7. Robbie Sacunas- 1.5

T-8. Tony Voda- 1

T-8. Brendan Weingarten-1

T-8. Anne Badders-1

T-8. Todd Cook-1

T-8. Max- 1

T-8. Tim Anderson- 1

T-8. David Imiola- 1

T-8. Jonathan Mueller- 1

Questions Remaining:

  • Historical Baseball Stuff- 0
  • Contemporary Baseball Stuff- 5
  • Ballpark Trivia- 9
  • Ballhawk Stats- 5
  • Name That Ballpark- 3
  • Trivia about the blog itself- 7
  • Moments in Observing Baseball History- 8

Observing Baseball Trivia. You may or may not remember it from last year, but regardless, there are a couple of rule changes; so I’m going to go over the updated rules as a whole:

  • 100 Questions total
  • These questions are divided as follows:
    • Historical Baseball Stuff- 10
    • Contemporary Baseball Stuff- 10
    • Ballpark Trivia- 25
    • Ballhawk Stats- 10
    • Name That Ballpark- 15
    • Trivia about the blog itself- 15
    • Moments in Observing Baseball History- 15
  • These questions can be asked anytime between when this entry is first published and 11:59 December 28th except for the 24 hours of December 25th; there will be a maximum of one question asked during this period. However, the question will be posted ON the hour or half-hour, so you only need to check around those two times and not in between.
  • Questioned will be a combination of multiple choice and short answer. Whether a question is to be answered by  multiple choice or short answer varies completely arbitrarily from question to question.
  • With every four questions, one will be on the blog, one will be on the Twitter account, one will be on the Facebook page, and one on the Instagram profile. However, they will not necessarily be on those sites in that order.
  • The first person to answer the question correctly by *MY* time stamp gets the point for the question.
  • Each contestant only gets one guess per question. After you have answered the question once, you may not be accredited with getting the question right on any subsequent attempts.
  • However, the questions, if unanswered, remain open to be answered correctly until all 100 are answered. The contest does not officially end until all 100 questions are correctly answered, or enough are answered to conclusively call a winner.
  • Label all answers with the question number followed by the answer you are submitting. Answers without question numbers attached will not be accepted as submissions.
  • To answer the question, reply *on the medium the question was asked. So if the question is on here, Instagram, or Facebook leave a comment on the post with the question in it in order to answer the question. If the question is on Twitter, reply to my tweet that I asked the question in with the answer to said question in your tweet.
  • When replying on Twitter, try to use the hashtag #OBTrivia in the tweets regarding this contest to help me see your answers and other stuff regarding the contest.
  • After the questions on the other sites are answered, I will put them on here with the correct answer bolded.
  • Players will be competing for their spot in choosing from the following prizes. So, the winner gets first choice; second place gets second choice, etc.
  • Contestants must have five points in order to qualify for a prize.

Here are the prizes to choose from:

1. Josh Willingham Bobblehead

Prize 1

2. Ball signed by over ten Minnesota Twins players and prospects

Prize 5

3. John Franco Bobblehead

Prize 2

4. (Slightly-faded) Craig Kribrel autographed baseball

Prize 6

5. Mets and Nationals W.B. Mason Collectible Trucks

Prize 3

6. Edinson Volquez autographed ball

Prize 8

7. Two Baseball Trivia Books

Prize 4

8. Your choice of Ice Cream Helmet

Prize 7

Once questions have been answered I’ll put a leaderboard at the beginning of the entry, but with all this said, let’s get to the contest:

1. What day did I write my first ever entry on Observing Baseball? (You can format the date however you want, but I need the exact date and year in the answer.)

October, 13, 2010 (Answered by: Nick Badders)

2. (on Twitter) Before Barry Zito, who was the last A’s Cy Young winner?

A) Vida Blue

B) Dennis Eckersley (Answered by: Nick Badders)

C) Catfish Hunter

D) Bob Welch

3. Name that Ballpark!

Number 3

Target Field (Answered by: Tony Voda)

4. (on Facebook) What is the name of the hill in Minute Maid Park?
A. Greene’s Hill

B. Tal’s Hill (Answered by: Larry)

C. Pieta Hill

D. Enron Hill

5. (on Twitter)Where is the flag pole at Target Field originally from?

A. Metrodome

B. Metropolitan Stadium(Answered by: Brendan Weingarten)

C. Griffith Stadium

D. 35-W Bridge

6. (on Facebook) Which of the following ballhawks was undefeated in head-to-head, season-long match-ups in 2013?

A. Erik Jabs

B. Zack Hample

C. Greg Barasch (Answered by: Anne Badders)

D. Rocco Sinisi

7. (on Instagram)Who is the MLB’s active AVG leader?

AL All-Stars

Joe Mauer (Answered by: Larry)

8. What day did I snag my 500th career baseball?

May, 13, 2013 (Answered by: Larry)

9. (on Facebook) Which of the following stadiums does not have a standing room section in the outfield?

A. Target Field

B. Oriole Park at Camden Yards

C. Progressive Field

D. Citizens Bank Park

None of the above (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

10. (on Instagram) What series of entries was this photo used in?

Zac Pitching

Ballhawk Profiles (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

11. (on Twitter) Which future manager led the Dodgers with a .364 average in the 1916 World Series?

Casey Stengel (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

12. What game did Tommy Hunter personalize a signed baseball for me and what was the reason?

May 10, 2013, because I got hit in the knee with a line-drive. (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

13.(on Twitter) What was the last year a non-Tiger won the AL MVP?

2010 (Josh Hamilton) (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

14. Which MLB stadium had the lowest Balls Per Game average in 2013?

A. Oakland Colliseum (Answered by: Nick Badders)

B. Rogers Centre

C. Wrigley Field

D. Citi Field

15. (on Instagram)Name that ballpark!

OPACY

Oriole Park at Camden Yards (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

16. (on Facebook) Who came in first place during last year’s Observing Baseball Trivia?

Nick Badders (Answered by: Harrsion Tishler, ironically.)

17. (on Facebook) Which Cinncinati Reds player won the MVP more than once?

A. Barry Larkin

B. Pete Rose

C. George Foster

D. Johnny Bench (Answered by: Larry)

18. (on Twitter) Which of the following doesn’t have a giant poster at Nationals Park?

A. Ian Desmond

B. Jayson Werth

C. Stephen Strasburg

D. Gio Gonzalez (Answered by: Nick Badders)

19. How many more games does Zack Hample have until he gets to 1,000 consecutive games with at least one ball snagged?

34 (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

20. (on Instagram) Name that ballpark!

Cell

US Cellular Field (Answered by: Larry)

21. (on Instagram) What MLB statistical category did these men lead in 2013, and what was significant about that category this year?

Hits

Hits, which was significant because no one in MLB got over 200 hits fro the first time since 1995. (Answered by: Harrison Tishler and Nick Badders.)

22. (on Twitter) Where did I snag my 100th career ball?

A. Citi Field

B. Nationals Park

C. AT&T Park

D. Tropicana Field (Answered by: Nick Badders)

23. (on Facebook) What role did I have with my high school baseball team when I began the blog?

A. Pitcher

B. Student Reporter for the high school newspaper

C. Student Manager (Answered by: Nick Badders)

D. Video Production Assistant

24. How many ballhawks snagged 100 baseballs or more in 2013?

A. 13

B. 18

C. 21 (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

D.25

25. What pitcher began his big-league career with 25 consecutive shutout innings?

A. Ed Siever

B. Babe Ruth

C. Nick Altrock

D. George McQuillan (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

26-33. (on Facebook) Name the members of the 600 HR club.

Barry Bonds, Babe Ruth, Hank Aaron, Alex Rodriguez, Jim Thome, Willie Mays, Sammy Sosa, Ken Griffey Jr. (Answered all by: Quinn Imiola)

34. (on Instagram) Name That Ballpark!

Mapes

Citi Field  (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

35.(on Twitter) How many MVP awards did Ken Griffey Jr. win in his career?

There are two answers, technically. He won one AL MVP, but won an All-Star MVP also. (Answered by: Nick Badders, Max, and Todd Cook)

36. In what was the date of the first game of Fenway Park’s existence played, and which stadium did it share this date with?

April, 20, 1912 and Tigers Stadium (Answered by: Quinn Imiola and Harrison Tishler)

37. (on Instagram) What was the promotion on the day I attended this stadium with Avi Miller?

Prince Edward

Manny Machado Garden Gnome (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

38. Who hit my only home run snag?

A. Chris Young

B. Trevor Plouffe (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

C. Sean Burroughs

D. Jay Bruce

39. (on Twitter)Which pitcher has the most wins since the start of the 2000 season?

C.C. Sabathia (Answered by: Tim Anderson)

40. What is the area in right field at Oriole Park at Camden Yards known as by ballhawks?

A. Boog’s Palace

B. Flag Court (Answered by: Quinn Imiola)

C. Warehouse District

D. Crush City

41. (on Instagram) Name That Ballpark!

Turner

Turner Field (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

42. (on Twitter) Who hit my first ever baseball snag?

A. David Justice

B. Jason Giambi

C. Mike Piazza

D. Chuck Knoblauch (Answered by: Robbie Sacunas)

43.(on Twitter) What are the single-season records for most double-digit ball games and Balls Per Game average?

49 and 9.50 (Answered by: Quinn Imiola)

44. How many different stadiums have I snagged milestone baseballs (100, 200, 300, etc) at?

A. 4

B. 3

C. 5 (Answered by: Quinn Imiola)

D. 6

45.(on Instagram) Name That Ballpark!

Nats Park

Nationals Park (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

46. What MLB stadium claims it is the home of “the wave”

A. Oakland Coliseum (Answered by: Quinn Imiola)

B. AT&T Park

C. Yankee Stadium

D. Marlins Park

If you even thought about D, I don’t think we can be friends anymore.

47.(on Twitter) What was the first season a ballhawk surpassed 500 baseballs in a season?

2008 (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

48. (on Instagram) Name That Ballpark!

Trop

Tropicana Field (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

49. What comes out of a hat every time the Mets hit a home run at home?

A. Baseball

B. Mr. Met (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

C. Apple

D. Bat

50.(on Instagram) How many seasons of baseball were played at the old Yankee Stadium?

YS

83 (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

51. What statistics did I write about in “Sabermetrics: The Explanation?”

On-Base Percentage
Slugging Percentage
Range Factor
Ultimate Zone Rating
Ratios per innings pitched
Defense independent or Park independent statistics
Component Statistics

(Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

52. (on Twitter)Which pitchers did I write about in “Pitching Aces in the Playoffs?”

Cliff Lee, Christopher John Wilson, CC Sabathia, Andy Pettite, Roy Halladay, Roy Oswalt, Cole Hamels, Tim Lincecum, Matt Cain, Jonathan Sanchez, Madison Bumgarner (Answered by: Quinn Imiola)

53. (on Instagram)Where was the counter for Cal Ripken Jr. as he approached Lou Gherig’s consecutive game streak in OPaCY, and what was the number that broke the record?

fa7488a46ea611e391e212b3df39af67_8

2131; on the warehouse. (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

54. (on Twitter) How many names has the stadium known once as Dolphins Stadium had?

Sun Life Stadium, Dolphin Stadium, Pro Player Park, Land Shark Stadium, Joe Robbie Stadium (Answered by: Maddie Landis)

55. Where did I snag my first ever baseball? (Be specific.)

Old Yankee Stadium (Answered by: Larry)

56. What was the date of the first rainout I documented on the blog?

May, 17, 2011 (Answered by: Paul Kom)

57. (on Twitter)Which one of the following did not meet Mike Trout on 7/24/11?

A. Zack Hample

B. Garrett Meyer

C. Tim Anderson (Answered by: Quinn Imiola)

D. Ben Weil

58. (on Facebook) What was the first season the Dodgers played in Los Angeles at LA Memorial Coliseum?

A. 1958 (Answered by: Nick Badders)

B. 1957

C. 1962

D. 1954

59. (on Instagram)How many baseballs did I snag with the glove trick during the game in which this picture was taken?

Miller Time

2 (Answered by: Quinn Imiola)

60. What ballpark did I compare Nationals Park to the first time I blogged about it?

Citi Field (Answered by: Quinn Imiola)

61. (on Twitter) Where can one find a pool?

A. Citi Field

B. AT&T Park

C. Chase Field (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

D. None of the Above

62. (on Instagram) Name That Ballpark!

8a0dadb46f2011e39dc4120cf9a4763f_8

Citi Field (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

63. (on Facebook) Where did I catch my first foul ball on the fly, and who was I with the game I did so?

Turner Field with my mom (Answered by: David Imiola)

64. Which of the following did I not think I could snag my 100th ball at?

A. Citi Field (Answered by: Quinn Imiola)

B. Nationals Park

C. AT&T Park

D. Tropicana Field

65. (on Facebook)Whose home run did I feel I should have snagged in my first game at Sun Life Stadium?

Mike Stanton (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

66. (on Twitter)What game did I meet Paul Kom and Tony Voda at?

August, 28, 2012 Mariners vs. Twins (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

67. (on Instagram) What time do all of Nationals Park’s gates open?

c4b128b66f2411e38f8812791ae4623c_8

1.5 hours before gametime (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

68. The two “D” logos that the Tigers use were defined as what by Todd Cook? (The __ D and the ___ D)

Hat D and Jersey D (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

69. (on Instagram)What does the position of the golden glove symbolize in term of Twins history?

177613_385228578228680_1505708678_o

The distance of Harmon Killebrew’s longest home run in franchise history. (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

70. (on Twitter) What was the date of my first game at Target Field, and what other “first” happened that day for me?

8/9/11 and I got shutout (Answered by: Paul Kom)

71. (on Facebook)What gate did I wait at in the first game I wrote about on Observing Baseball? And why did I go there? (include stadium.

New Yankee Stadium Gate 8 (centerfield gate) and because I wanted to avoid the crowd (Answered by: Quinn Imiola)

72. What was the name of my friend who accompanied me for the game during which I snagged my first and only home run?

Jonathan (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

73. (on Twitter) What was a giant factor in me getting my only 11-baseball game at Target Field?

I got in early because of Tony Voda (Answered by: Paul Kom)

74. (on Facebook) What game did I get my 200th ball at Target Field at?

September, 29, 2013 Indians at Twins (Answered by: Quinn Imiola)

75. (on Instagram) Name That Ballpark!

75f5935c6f2d11e3937912a419d7799c_8

RFK Stadium (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

76. Who did I tie in head-to-head match-ups in 2013?

A. Greg Barasch

B. Tony Voda (Answered by: Quinn Imiola)

C. Paul Kom

D. Erik Jabs

77. (on Instagram) What problem did I run into at the gate of this game?

a5c728f66f3811e3b1601202e6d85e9f_8

The Mets had changed their gate times (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

78. (on Facebook) How many people have ever had the most baseballs at a BallhawkFest?

A. 4

B. 5

C. 6

D. 7 (Answered by: Maddie Landis)

79. (on Twitter) I own memorabilia dealing with whose perfect game?

A. David Cone

B. David Wells

C. Roy Halladay

D. None of the above (Answered by: Jonathan Mueller)

80. What stadium did Don Larsen throw his perfect game at?

A. Dodgers Stadium

B. Ebbets Field

C. Yankee Stadium (Answered by: Quinn Imiola)

D. Polo Grounds

81. (on Facebook) What Colombian pitcher did I purposefully try to get a ball from when his team visited Nationals Park in 2012?

Julio Teheran (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

82. (on Instagram) When he got the triple crown, Miguel Cabrera was the first to do so since who in what year?

5a68b40c6f5a11e388db12ee1d4b3169_8

Carl Yastrzemski in 1967 (Answered by: Quinn Imiola)

83. (on Twitter) Who is my favorite active player in MLB?

Tim Lincecum (Answered by: Quinn Imiola)

84. What was the first game I ever went to with my current roommate, Sean Bigness, and who did we learn spoke Spanish during the pre-game warm-ups?

9/12/12 and Bruce Chen (Answered by: Harrison Tishler)

85. (on Instagram) What was the tempurature below when I got to the gate for opening day?

a30714206f5e11e3a4d80e849028c7eb_8

Sub-30 (Answered by: Maddie Landis)

86. (on Twitter) What was the name of the person who took pictures for me the day I snagged my 100th baseball at Yankee Stadium?

Andy Bingham (Answered by: Quinn Imiola)

87. (on Facebook)Which player’s face do I have on a stick?

Joe Mauer (Answered by: Quinn Imiola)

88. What schools did I look at in my 2011 August trip? (More than one point available, but answer each school as a separate comment. You can guess as much as you like, but only the guesses before your first incorrect guess will be counted.)

University of Minnesota

89. (on Twitter) Who accompanied me in my first ever trip to Target Field?

My Uncle (Answered by: Paul Kom)

90. In what year was the first regular season game held at the Metrodome?

1982 (Answered by: Paul Kom)

Also, since it is the next most voted-for category, let me know which stadium you would like me to do a Stadium Profile entry on in this poll:

2013-14 Winter Writing Ideas

Since it’s now winter, it’s time for some ideas for what to write about in this time of lull:

So now that you’ve watched the video, here is the poll for you to vote on the ideas:

Remember that you can vote for as many of the ten as you would like. However, I would like to make one revision to the rules I put forth in the video. Instead of the poll opening anew every time I publish a new entry, I’m actually going to make it so you can vote once more every week, since that’s easier to program into the poll. I don’t know when I’ll start writing these entries since I am currently in finals week, but I’ll write an entry putting forth a schedule for writing when the time comes that I feel like I can semi-stick to a schedule.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 413 other followers

%d bloggers like this: